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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 1,769 total)
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  • in reply to: Object Error Reference #13396

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello David,

    Please ensure you have the most current version. If you do and the problem remains, please send a complete error report ( https://forum.axcrypt.net/blog/send-complete-error-report/ ).

    in reply to: File is not an AxCrypt file and it is 0 bytes. #13326

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello Jari,

    First of all, you are probably using version 1.x (or at least were using it when the files in question were encrypted). There was a known issue there when this could happen if a file was on a removable medium and it was removed without using the ‘safe removal’ feature of Windows.

    Since the files are literally empty, zero bytes, there is nothing there. I am sorry, but the data is lost and needs to be recovered from backup copies. You can thus delete them, there is no reason to keep them.

    in reply to: Encryption Security With Version 1.7.3201.0 vs Version 2.x #13314

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello Steve,

    The use of SHA-1 in AxCrypt is actually still ok, and it does not affect the security in the sense that it’s easier to decrypt because of the limitations of SHA-1. It is used for two things – to produce a 128-bit key from your password, and to make a so-called HMAC – a keyed message authentication code, or a checksum. In extreme theory, although as mentioned in this use case it’s not practical, a low-security HMAC would enable an attacker to make a change to the encrypted data, and the HMAC would not flag this change. The decrypted data would still be wrong, and it will not help the attacker decrypt the data. The use of SHA-1 to produce the actual 128-bit key used for encryption is also a safe use. It will not help an attacker to decrypt the file.


    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello Destinee,

    If an employee steals or destroys or hides company property, under most legislations this is illegal under civil or public law.

    Encrypting data and keeping the encryption key secret is equivalent to destroying it if the key is not released.

    There is no way to decrypt the documents without knowing the password used.

    Therefore you should contact your company law firm or the police as appropriate, to make the former employee give you the password or else seek damages and/or a conviction in a court of law.

    in reply to: Interference from multiple files of same-type (Windows) #12993

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello Paul,

    This is indeed so. It has to do with how applications works and how AxCrypt can determine if a file is “free” for re-encryption or not.

    With Notepad, there’s no way to know what it has open so when a file is opened with Notepad AxCrypt waits until *all* instances of Notepad are closed. This is the same for many applications.

    in reply to: Windows 10 Axcrypt corrupted? Help! #12922

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello H J,

    Please provide screen shots with the exact messages if you can. You may also do so and contacting support@axcrypt.net .

    in reply to: Security issue on Android #12834

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello Normand,

    The way phones work requires us to copy the file to our local location when we decrypt them for viewing. They remain there until you explicitly remove them from AxCrypt. There is a context menu for that.

    in reply to: Iconic change #12833

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello Marcelo,

    Unfortunately we believe the icon change is essential (and hard to avoid…). It makes it clear what files are encrypted.

    It is also hard to retain the original icon, since the icon is normally associated with the extension (.docx, .xlsx, .pfd, .png, .axx) etc. and this changes to .axx for all encrypted files regardless of the original file.

    The use of so called icon overlays is possible, but complicated and actually never really works 100% so we don’t want to go that route.

    in reply to: Axcript Errors out when being used via VPN #12832

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello Terri,

    First of all – the error messages indicate that you are using version 1.x of AxCrypt. This versions is obsolete, unmaintained and unsupported…

    The scenario in question with multiple users is not one where AxCrypt may be the best choice. AxCrypt works by decrypting the file to a local location, and then when the software detects that the user is done with the file, it re-encrypts the file and copies it back to the original location.

    That being said, provided the VPN is stable, it should work the same as over a local area network in the office.

    You might want to try version 2.x of AxCrypt. While it works essentially the same, the way it does it is more conservative than version 1.x and it operates via the .NET file access instead of directly via Win32 (Windows native calls). In the end, it should be the same – but…

    in reply to: Recovered Axcrypt files indicate GUID error #12831

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello David,

    In this case it seems the recovery was not successful. The error in question indicates that the first 16 bytes of the file does not match the expected value – which in turn indicates a strong likelyhood the entire file is completely corrupted.

    So, the answer is unfortunately, no – you can’t repair these files. Sorry.

    in reply to: File Password Never Set #12826

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello Nate,

    I can’t check your account because I don’t know the account name – but I’m fairly sure you did not do a password *change* – you did a password *reset*. A *change* requires you to know the existing password, and will allow you to open previously encrypted files with the new password. A *reset* just resets the account password so you can sign in – but you can’t open the previously encrypted files with the new password. If this was possible, AxCrypt would not be much of an encryption solution…

    So, when you do a password reset, you get access to the account, but opening previously encrypted files requires you to know the password that was in effect at the time of the encryption – thus the term ‘file password’.

    in reply to: Web Site Login Page #12823

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello,

    You can always send email to support@axcrypt.net – if you have a computer and a working email account of course.

    We have now identified a programming error that probably caused your problem, and we have repaired your account. Please try again and let us know if there are further problems.

     

    in reply to: Changing From W7 to W10 – Can't Unencrypt Docs #12800

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello Ian,

    Version 2.x of AxCrypt can decrypt all files encrypted by version 1.x or later.

    Version 1.x of AxCrypt can only decrypt files encrypted by version 1.x (not 2.x).

    in reply to: Access #12799

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello Richard,

    Please contact support att axcrypt dott net . Please note that it is never a requirement to purchase anything to decrypt an encrypted file on your PC or Mac. You only need to know the password.

    If you are literally getting an “access denied” message, this has nothing to do with AxCrypt. You may have moved the files from a different Windows computer, and lack the NTFS permissions (google “take ownership ntfs” for more info), or you may have encrypted the files with EFS, Encrypting File System and done a password reset or re-install of Windows (google “efs access denied” for more info).

    in reply to: Access #12798

    Svante
    Spectator

    Hello Richard,

    Please contact support att axcrypt dott net . Please note that it is never a requirement to purchase anything to decrypt an encrypted file on your PC or Mac. You only need to know the password.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 1,769 total)